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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
later about education, higher education is often the first thing on the menu to cut in many states because young people don't vote in as great a number. that needs to be clearer and more boldly stated by the candidates. >> it's an interesting point. if i'm tutoring at the neighborhood school, i get the instant gratification. if i vote for a candidate, the candidate is a messy sort of things. it also feels to me, ben, part of what that distinction is between charity and justice. charity feels good but justice takes a long time. i hate to do the, oh, young people need to cultivate patience thing, but it does feel a little like that sense. >> look at our culture. we have the high speed internet, fast food. meanwhile you have a gridlocked congress where very little, if not anything is getting done. i think this was the least productive congress ever. >> on purpose. >> reconciling those two forces at odds is difficult for those people. >> we'll come right back to you, valerie and felicia. when we come back, young voters out there, if you're listening, president obama really does have a
levees. i kept thinking, the category 5 levees we need are shelter and quality education and health care for everybody and infrastructure and transportation so that people can move on. is there any possibility of taking that and making it a broader conversation, environmental policy or housing policy that makes it easier to manage this? >> i think there is. i agree with neera that people like this post-partisan moment. they are tired of partisan politics and nothing getting done. we need it all. we need education and infrastructure. bloomberg endorsed obama citing global warming as the cause. twice in the last 14 months, new york city has had to evacuate. that has never happened before in the city's history. all these things are in play. this has changed the dynamic. there is a sense we need to move on this. i wish we could have bipartisan agreement on how to move forward. >> it is tough to have bipartisan agreement when republicans keep being climate change designers and anti-science in a variety of ways. >> anti-science, we are still dealing with 46 million people on food stamps. we ar
reproductive rights and access is not a distraction from real issues. women's health, education aal opportunities, and economic equality are directly related to unfettered safe access to birth control and abortion. in countries where women control their own fertility, they are more educated, less poor, and more likely to be engaged politically. but mitt romney prefer that supreme court kol women's choices. he would like to see rowe v. wade overturned. president obama, on the other hand, has never waivered in his staunch assertion that women can be trusted to make their own decisio decisions. joining me on my panel here is author of "big girls don't cry." first, i want to bring in my very special guest from oakland, california, democratic senator barbara boxer. senator, it is so good for you to join us this evening. thank you. >> i'm delighted. just delighted. >> senator boxer, talk to me a bit about what we saw happen in 2008 on the one hand sort of women showing up in an amazing way as secretary of state clinton has said, putting all of those cracks in the glass ceiling and then ro
or two big ballot measures that were really well campaigned on and educated and then you made your decision, that would be one thing. what we've seen is too much democracy, too much choice, which is a practical matter, you have down ballot voting where a lot of people don't bother to choose. the people who do choose aren't as well informed. i'll question back to the saturday night live ad about the undecided voters. when is the election some who? s who is the president? and be specific. and if you have trouble remembering the two people running for president, what do you think happening in a confusing 1% worded ballot like that. >> but sometimes there is a decent amount of information. the key one that i'm focusing on is the maryland marriage equality one. and there is a lot of information and a lot of bhalgts grounding going on with that. but i'm still distressed because it's not clear to me that someone's fundamental civil rights ought to be on a ballot. i mean, if slavery had been voted on, pretty sure it would have taken another, i don't know, tech and i had, two decades, maybe
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)